Board of Directors

Peter Dimock

Peter Dimock

Peter Dimock has spent over thirty years in publishing. The former senior editor at Random House and Columbia University Press is also the author of A Short Rhetoric For Leaving the Family and George Anderson: Notes for a Love Song in Imperial Time. In addition to editing three of Peter Maguire’s four books, Dimock edited Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison’s Playing in the Dark; Nobel Prize winner Amartya Sen’s Development as Freedom; Siddharth Kara’s Sex Trafficking: Inside the Business of Modern Slavery (winner of the 2010 Frederick Douglass Book Prize); and Benjamin Brower’s A Desert Named Peace: The Violence of France’s Empire in the Algerian Sahara, 1844–1902 (winner of the 2010 Albert Hourani Prize of the Middle East Studies Association and the 2009 Pinkney Prize of the Society for French Historical Studies). Dimock was a founding editor of Rethinking Capitalism, a joint publication of the Bruce Initiative at the University of California at Santa Cruz and the Cultures of Finance Working Group at New York University. He is Publishing Coordinator and Editor for The Wealth of Society Book Project at New York University. He is a publishing consultant for the Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program and was editor for the peer-reviewed online scholarly journal, Oppositional Conversations.

Joan Tewkesbury

Joan Tewkesbury

Joan Tewkesbury began her career at age ten as a dancer in MGM’s The Unfinished Dance (1947). A few years later she appeared on Broadway as an ostrich, an Indian, and Mary Martin’s flying understudy in Jerome Robbins’s Peter Pan (1954). She attended the University of Southern California, then became a choreographer, a theater director, a script supervisor for Robert Altman’s film McCabe and Mrs. Miller, and a writer of the feature films Thieves Like Us and Nashville and the director of Old Boyfriends, which was presented at “Director’s Fortnight” at the Cannes Film Festival. She has also written and directed numerous projects for cable and network television: The Tenth Month, Acorn People, Cold Sassy Tree, Sudie and Simpson, Wild Texas Wind, the HBO series The Stranger, On Promised Land, and Elysian Fields, and was a consulting producer for the CBS series The Guardian. For the stage she wrote, directed and choreographed Dance Card for the Oregon Ballet Theatre; wrote and directed Jammed, a play presented at the Edinburgh Festival; and wrote, directed, and produced Retrospective at the Manhattan Theatre Source in New York. In 2006 she developed a class, “Designed Obstacles, Spontaneous Response” which she has taught at Art Center, the American Film Institute, Bard College, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, U.C.L.A., N.A.L.I.P. and various filmmaking labs and immersion programs throughout the United States, Israel, Europe, and Japan. She is a creative advisor for the Sundance Institute Native Lab and the Sundance Institute Directors and Screenwriters Lab and created a Writers Forum at Los Luceros in Alcalde, NM. Her work has been honored by the Writers Guild, Humanitas, Golden Globes, the British Academy Awards, Cable Ace, an Academy Awards best picture nomination for Nashville, and the Los Angeles Critics award for best original screenplay.

Ron Copley

Ron Copley

Ron Copley founded Copley Investment Management (CIM) in 1985. Prior to that, Ron served in the 5th Special Forces Group in the US Army from 1966 to 1969 during which he received the Bronze Star for valor as an infantry officer in Vietnam. After his military service, Ron pursued his education and careers in both academia and the investment advisory business. He has served as a professor of finance at Queens College, Memphis University, UNC Chapel Hill and UNC Wilmington, where he published over 40 academic and professional articles. Currently, CIM manages approximately $75 million for individuals and small business retirement plans, provides business valuations for legal matters, and actively provides international consulting services to foreign governments. He is conversant in Arabic and Japanese.

Jonathan Bush

Jonathan Bush is a lawyer and author teaching at Columbia Law School, where his courses include Nuremberg, The Law of War and War Crimes, and Human Rights Reparations in International and Domestic Law. Among his recent articles is a study of postwar trials for Nazi economic crimes (Columbia Law Review, June 2009). He is currently writing the biography of Telford Taylor (1908-98), the American constitutional lawyer and chief prosecutor at the later twelve Nuremberg trials (1946-49), and has co-edited, with Prof Donald Bloxham, Prosecution without Precedent: The Diary of an American Nuremberg Prosecutor (Berghahn Books, forthcoming). Bush previously taught at the University of Texas (Austin) Law School, Santa Clara Law School, Yeshiva University, and Brooklyn Law School. Before entering academia, Bush was founding General Counsel of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum (Washington, DC) and a trial lawyer with the U.S. Department of Justice, prosecuting Nazi war criminals. Bush obtained his undergraduate degree from Princeton, his graduate degree from Oxford, and his law degree from Yale. His areas of academic concentration are international and criminal law and American and British legal history; he has written on war crimes and trials during and after World War II and elsewhere, the legal treatment of medieval and Renaissance Jews, and the origins of slavery in North America. Professor Bush has held senior fellowships at the Center for Scholars & Writers (New York Public Library), the National Humanities Center (Research Triangle Park, NC), the School of History, Institute for Advanced Study (Princeton, NJ), and the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum (Washington, DC). He has also been co-counsel or consulted in a number of legal cases including Rumsfeld v. Padilla (2004) and Hamdan v. Rumsfeld (2006).